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Last Post 13 Jul 2010 01:54 PM by  Peppler33CS
New to SCCA
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Ace0038
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19 Jun 2010 12:21 PM
    Hey guys, I've been involved in circle track racing most of my life and more recently drag racing a mild '72 Buick street/strip car I've had for awhile now. I've gotten bitten by the racing bug pretty bad again and want to get rid of the muscle car and get in to road racing. I know nothing about SCCA but figured it would be the only organization around that turned left and right. I'm not interested in autocross or solo events, and I know to race SCCA you need to be licensed.... other than that I need schooled pretty badly. Anyone willing to take in a quick learner under their wings?
    FWR Solo D
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    19 Jun 2010 01:52 PM
    PM sent...
    bmonnin1
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    21 Jun 2010 11:40 AM

    Ace0038 wrote:
    Hey guys, I've been involved in circle track racing most of my life and more recently drag racing a mild '72 Buick street/strip car I've had for awhile now. I've gotten bitten by the racing bug pretty bad again and want to get rid of the muscle car and get in to road racing. I know nothing about SCCA but figured it would be the only organization around that turned left and right. I'm not interested in autocross or solo events, and I know to race SCCA you need to be licensed.... other than that I need schooled pretty badly. Anyone willing to take in a quick learner under their wings?

    Actually there are a lot more then just the SCCA out there that go right and left in the local area. Not sure how fast you are planning to get into road racing and whether or not you already have a car but there are two ways to get an SCCA license. First way is to take a school sponsored by a region (actually two schools but most of the times they are done on the same weekend), unfortunately the next school locally will not be until spring at Nelson Ledges, at least not that I have heard. The second way to get a SCCA license is take a private road race school (Skip Barber, Mid-Ohio, ect.), again you need to take two schools. I believe that the SCCA will also accept a road racing license from other organizations as proof you have the training.

    Another way to get some track time and some schooling is try an open track or PDX. See if you like turning right and left, it is quite a bit different from circle track and drag racing. Beyond the SCCA there are several local groups that sponser open tracks to include NASA, Porsche Club, the BMW CCA (all three also have road racing programs), Track Daze, 3-Balls Racing, 10/10ths Motorsports, and more that I can't remember. All of these organizations provide experienced instructors. Waterford Hills, Gingerman, and Nelson Ledges also have track sponsored Open Track days at their facilities but all of them except Waterford Hills do not supply instructors. The important thing to remember about Open Tracks, it is not racing and most groups have strick passing rules (only pass in certain areas of track and only if the person you are passing points you by).

    Best way to learn what is need to go racing is to download the GCR off the SCCA website and start there.

    sts38
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    21 Jun 2010 04:38 PM

    You can also reach out to our competition director Larry Dent.

    Email - lwdent@wildblue.net

    Phone - 260-357-4105

    Ace0038
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    23 Jun 2010 06:03 AM

    Lots of good information bmonnin1, thanks for the solid reply. I'll take a look at the GCD and go from there. I have two cars right now but neither are road racing worthy, my daily driver is an 03 GMC Envoy and my 72 Buick goes like hell in a straight line but takes the corners like an old lady with her blinker stuck on. If I get serious about this the Buick will have to go to make room for the road car and my girlfriend is not going to be happy that I'm getting back in to racing.

    Bottom line I need to hit the track for an open test session sometime and see how I like turning turning both ways, maybe even hit up an autocross event sometime and meet some of you guys in person. If any of you ever need another set of hands at the track or just need a co-pilot for something feel free to PM me and I'll send you my cell number.

    bmonnin1
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    26 Jun 2010 05:14 AM
    Ace0038 wrote:

    Lots of good information bmonnin1, thanks for the solid reply. I'll take a look at the GCD and go from there. I have two cars right now but neither are road racing worthy, my daily driver is an 03 GMC Envoy and my 72 Buick goes like hell in a straight line but takes the corners like an old lady with her blinker stuck on. If I get serious about this the Buick will have to go to make room for the road car and my girlfriend is not going to be happy that I'm getting back in to racing.

    Bottom line I need to hit the track for an open test session sometime and see how I like turning turning both ways, maybe even hit up an autocross event sometime and meet some of you guys in person. If any of you ever need another set of hands at the track or just need a co-pilot for something feel free to PM me and I'll send you my cell number.

    Just as an additional comment even though your ultimate goal is to be a road racer you may want to try to do some autocross. There is an old saying that a great autocrosser will make a great road racer but a great road racer will not make a great autocrosser. Autocrossing teaches you precision, car placement, how to look ahead, ect that will translate into road racing and it is much cheaper then road racing. Great way to improve your skills between road races. The steering imputs are much faster and more violent in autocross then road racing but if you can be smooth in autocross being smooth in a road race is much easier. I have attached a couple of videos I did, one of autocross and one of an Open Track at Mid-Ohio where I have video of me driving the car so you can see the differences in the steering input. Please realize that the Mid-Ohio video is my first time at the track and I have to drive the vehicle home so I am not pushing the limit of the car.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNZsP4yYapw

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8GajdC9qpGU

    Ace0038
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    11 Jul 2010 12:41 PM
    I'm warming up to autocrossing in a big way. Being new to this I don't know what kind of a car to start looking for. I've got around 8k to spend and have always had a thing for Subarus and 350Z's. I want a car that's fun to drive and competitive. I see alot of VWs and 3 series BMWs. Advice?
    sts38
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    12 Jul 2010 05:39 AM

    Ace0038 wrote:
    I'm warming up to autocrossing in a big way. Being new to this I don't know what kind of a car to start looking for. I've got around 8k to spend and have always had a thing for Subarus and 350Z's. I want a car that's fun to drive and competitive. I see alot of VWs and 3 series BMWs. Advice?

    I love the ST classes....you can mildly mod and tires are reasonable. Bugeye WRX - STX, Miata/CRX - STS, S2k - STR, Civic - ST

    Ace0038
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    13 Jul 2010 11:20 AM
    Theres a Miata convertible pretty close to me I can get cheap but how competitive are the cars? I hear things about Miatas handling well but being down on power. And getting in to a car on the cheaper side and putting some money in to it sounds like a better idea to me than putting all the money upfront in to a more expensive car. Are there specific models of Miatas that are better than others, GT, SS, that kinda thing?
    Peppler33CS
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    13 Jul 2010 01:54 PM
    Travis drove a Miata this weekend... I'm sure he'll tell us how well he liked it [:)]


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