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Last Post 31 Oct 2005 02:27 PM by  pknowles
How much could a 98 ford ranger XLT 4X4 w/3liter V6 tow??
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weasel KP61
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27 Oct 2005 02:04 AM
    I am wanting to tow my 1800 lb car to the auto X and am wondering if my 98 ford ranger XLT 4X4 w/3liter V6 can tow it and the trailer that carries the car? How much could the ford ranger tow?
    Davard
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    27 Oct 2005 11:06 PM
    Stick or auto? Ford (and most domestic manufacturers) rate stick at less than auto in their small trucks. Japanese manufacturers generally rate them the same (stick vs auto).





    I'd wager a guess and say that you can tow 2000lbs with the stick and 4000-4500lbs with the auto...just don't be in a hurry. And you'll be happier in the midwest than on either coast (less mountains). And you'll want a receiver style hitch and trailer brakes (not an option). A load-equalizer and sway control are really good options, too.





    And I guarantee someone will advise against it. [:)]



    Edit: While I didn't find anything for '98, I found something for the '99 model year. http://www.trailerlife.com/download...gguide.pdf

    And you'll likely tow in Drive, not OD. And hopefully, your tranny will lock the torque converter while in drive (my '85 S-10 wouldn't).
    Primetime Glick
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    28 Oct 2005 07:22 AM

    weasel KP61 wrote:
    I am wanting to tow my 1800 lb car to the auto X and am wondering if my 98 ford ranger XLT 4X4 w/3liter V6 can tow it and the trailer that carries the car? How much could the ford ranger tow?

    Hmmm, many years ago we had a 3.0L/2wd/auto Aerostar tow a ~1500# trailer and ~#3000 car. It did OK, barely adequate IIRC, and almost got stuck at the muddy track we ran at. We ended up getting an AWD/4.0L 'star and it did better. Not sure of the rear gear ratios, but both had "tow packages" and short 205/70-14 tires.

    Your ranger is probably around the same weight as a 2wd 'star and the 3.0L hasn't changed much. That trailer better be real light, and you better not be carrying much gear. I would say you're pushing it. If you've got tall off-road tires or something, you may need some deep gears to compensate; the 3.0 is a tiny, weak engine.

    Dick Rasmussen
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    28 Oct 2005 07:41 AM
    Based on paying attention to Ford (and other) tow ratings over the years the ratings for your particular truck can vary significantly depending on a bunch of things such as transmission, rear gear ratio, tow package, springs, etc. Have you checked your local Ford dealer or tried signing up on the Ford owners website and putting in your VIN. Also, contrary to the post above, most Ford ratings I've seen for the small trucks are HIGHER for autos than for sticks (probably clutch wear issues assuming unskilled drivers). To get in the general "ballpark" you might try looking at the tow rating variables for a current version of the same basic truck which should be readily available.

    Dick
    Primetime Glick
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    28 Oct 2005 08:40 AM

    Dick Rasmussen wrote:
    most Ford ratings I've seen for the small trucks are HIGHER for autos than for sticks (probably clutch wear issues assuming unskilled drivers).

    There's that, but also because deeper gears and "tow packages" (HD susp., fluid cooler., etc) are usually coupled with auto trans only -- at least on light-duty trucks.

    ACM
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    29 Oct 2005 09:41 AM
    Based on my 97 4x2 4.0l Ranger, it can tow itself and not much more ! Back then I was on dirt bikes - with a pair of ~250lb dirt bikes, race gas, race gear etc I couldn't use 5th half the time, and the thing could barely hold 70mph. Fuel consumption under these conditions was barely in double digits.

    I bought it new and traded it 9 months later, it was the most useless truck I'd ever owned, an order of magnitude worse than the Dakota and S10s that preceded it.

    Charles Moss
    Davard
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    30 Oct 2005 06:29 PM
    Dick Rasmussen wrote:
    Also, contrary to the post above, most Ford ratings I've seen for the small trucks are HIGHER for autos than for sticks (probably clutch wear issues assuming unskilled drivers). To get in the general "ballpark" you might try looking at the tow rating variables for a current version of the same basic truck which should be readily available.



    Dick


    So, what part of my post did you misunderstand? This part?

    "Stick or auto? Ford (and most domestic manufacturers) rate stick at less than auto in their small trucks. Japanese manufacturers generally rate them the same (stick vs auto). "

    Or this one?

    "I'd wager a guess and say that you can tow 2000lbs with the stick and 4000-4500lbs with the auto..."

    I'm not upset, I just don't like being misquoted.

    And the primary restriction of stick vs auto isn't the clutch, it's the transmission and the rear axle. The manual trannies in the small (domestic) trucks aren't robust enough and the rear axles can't handle the shock loading of a manual tranny. (I think that they also have little faith in the driving ability of the average American driver... probably well-founded). As an example, Dodge has used heavier rear axles (Dana 80 vs 70) when their full-sized trucks were equipped with a manual transmission vs an automatic.

    Here's an excerpt from the Trailer Life towing guide (PDF address above) for 1999, which has specific info.

    Ranger 4WD 3.0 V-6 4,360 a,e
    Ranger SuperCab 4WD 3.0 V-6 4,200 a,e
    Ranger SuperCab 4WD 3.0 V-6 2,240 d,f,i

    a Requires automatic transmission and towing package.
    d Requires 3.73:1 axle ratio.
    e Requires 3.98/4.09/4.10:1 axle ratio.
    f Manual transmission.
    i Must be equipped with heavy-duty towing package.
    Dick Rasmussen
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    30 Oct 2005 06:38 PM
    David,

    Opps!!!! I guess I need to get either new glasses or a new brain. Sorry about that.

    Dick
    pknowles
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    31 Oct 2005 02:27 PM
    Cars.com lists a max trailer weight of 2,100-2,300 lbs for your truck depending on which cab you have. So no gear and your 1,800 lb car on a light dolly would be close to 2,100 lbs.
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