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Last Post 06 Oct 2009 07:48 AM by  hancheyb
Vorshlag Motorsports Evo X MR Build (STU, TTB, One Lap?)
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Fair
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20 Nov 2008 07:29 PM

    Howdy!

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    Some might know us, some might not (Terry and Brian here at Vorshlag have been doing SCCA events for 20+ years). Allow me to give a brief introduction to Vorshlag. We've been designing and building camber plates for BMWs since 2003 and have recently begun branching out into designing plates for Evos (8/9/10), Subaru, Minis, Mustangs and more as our customers buy different vehicles. We have camber plates on the street still running with original bearings in prototype plates from 2003. They are extremely overbuilt.

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    Left: Pre-production plates built for Mark Berry's F Prepared Beast. Right: Our E36 plates have offered unmatched durability and performance and have been sold to hundreds upon hundreds of E36 racers

    We're also the importer for AST Suspension (built completely in The Netherlands, aka: "Holland"). AST builds single, double and triple adjustable monotube dampers that are designed for street, track, and endurance racing. Importing them also means we are the rebuild/revalve center for AST Stateside. Need something custom and we do it here in Texas. Again, we're primarily a suspension manufacturer. You won't see any big turbos, exhaust etc. coming from us. We either make it ourselves or partner with other companies as we go. And if you have a favorite local tuner shop, ask for us. We sell through a dealer network as well.

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    Left: AST 4300 triple adjustable shocks. Right: Vorshlag camber plate on AST strut

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    In this thread we wanted to talk about was our new toy, a new Evo X MR. We're in the Dallas/Ft. Worth Texas area so naturally you head to Don Herring Mitsubishi when you want an EVO. We met with Don Jr. and got the ball rolling purchasing a WW '08 Evo X MR. Why the MR? We're trying to build, the ultimate multi-purpose car. Street, track, autocross, you name it and we'll do it in this car. If you haven't met Don Herring Jr. you need to. He supports the local community (with monthly contingencies for Texas Region regional events won by Mitsus and a $500 year end championship payout to almost any class won by one of their models!) more than any dealer we've ever met.

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    First track test, prior to our first find - the now infamous "SLOW DOWN" on the dash (transmission overheating).

    We have designed the EVO X camber plates and prototypes are built. AST has shipped the first set of AST 4200s (double adjustable, no reservoir, great for NASA TT rules). Two weekends at ECR showed some serious camber loss and body roll. We'll fix both shortly with the new suspension upgrades.

    We're building our own 3" cat back for now and ditching the factory battery for a lightweight unit (DEKA). The Evo needs a diet! We're searching for light 18x10s for the 275s we'll run in NASA Time Trials. They might end up being CCWs at this point. Cobb Tuning downloaded the MR code off our car and is testing their programming against the MR. They found the GT-R's semi-automatic required special attention during shifts so they'll do the same careful testing with the SST. The car will primarily run in NASA TT-B (possibly moving to TT-A eventually) and SCCA's STU autocross class. We're hopeful we can make One Lap as well with the car. We'll probably take it along with our LS1 powered BMW for GRM's UTCC at VIR next year.

    Thanks for listening. More pics are here as well: http://vorshlag.smugmug.com/gallery/6545363_ngEfx

    Fair
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    20 Nov 2008 07:46 PM

    [U]Update: Transmission Cooling Fan Mod[/U]

    After the first "baseline stock" track outing (ECR, Oct 11, 2008) in a new 2008 EVO X "MR" we noted that after 2-3 hard laps the transmission would overheat during each 20 minute session. This was with a totally stock suspension and drivetrain - so why didn't any of the million magazine articles praising the EVO X's flappy paddle semi-automatic "DSG" style transmission mention this after their many on-track tests? Well apparently it only happens when 1) driven harder the most automotive journalists can muster (yes, that was a jab!) and 2) when drivers employ Left Foot Braking. But ... with no clutch pedal, what sane racing driver wouldn't use LFB on track? That's one of the big pluses of these 2 pedal transmissions - the ability to let each pedal have its own foot. Colin McRae said it best about LFB use.

    We soon found out from talking to a local Mitsubishi dealer (big props again to Don Herring Jr!) that when the brake pedal is even lightly pressed ("covering the pedal", which is what you do when you are using a Left Foot Braking technique) the clutch is semi-disengaged... allowing for clutch slip and potential transmission overheating. One automotive journalist did in fact have this happen during the press testing barrage, but it was overlooked. Well, Hanchey track drove the car like it should be driven - using LFB technique. That could have caused some of the overheating problem, but we wanted to improve transmission cooling just in case it reared its head again at the next track event (less than 5 days after the first event was run) or at the next autocross, where we would be using LFB, by damn. What's the point of buying a $40K performance car if you have to drive it like Mr. Magoo??

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    L: EVO X with fog lights covering up the oil coolers. R: Fog light housings removed and coolers exposed to more airflow!

    The EVO X "MR" models' trans overheating woes are fairly well known on the interweb with track drivers already, and even acknowledged by Mitsubishi dealers and Mitsu corporate. They promote the Super Sport transmission mode "for track use" but didn't quite get the cooling right on their first iteration (and even had a production halt in February on the MR to address this). We aimed to improve that instead of waiting for a "factory update" - we can't let the transmission melt down while waiting for a fix. So, after that initial track day where 3 hot laps was about the limit before "trans over temp...SLOW DOWN!" alarms would chime, Hanchey decided to come up with his own solution.

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    After a look at the shop manual he noted problems in the ducting and location of the SST transmission cooler, and thus where some of the problems probably stemmed from - insufficient air flow to cool the heat exchanger, which was buried behind a fog light assembly, a wonky looking air duct, and cooling air that exited into the left front wheel well. Brian suggested adding a cooling fan to the back of the cooler and I suggested removing the fog lights - in the end we did both.

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    After Brian sourced a stout looking 5.2" diameter fan from Spal that was made for this type of use, we tore into the installation late one night at the shop. We thought we might be able to get away with a quick 30 minute install, but access to the front of the cooler was very limited, so off came the front bumper. I wanted an excuse to take a look under there for large lead weights or other ballast - [I]something to explain this 3600 pound curb weight![/I] - and we did indeed get to uncover a few things about the EVO X with a look under the skin.

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    The front bumper removal was the hardest part of this project, but a glance at the shop manual helped us track down the thirty or so fasteners that held the bumper cover and lower shrouds in place. Once it was off we could see that Hanchey had chosen the perfect size fan from Spal, and it went on with the included fasteners, plus a few washers and some rubber hose used to make a compliant seal between fan and heat exchanger. This was a "sucker" fan, so its mounted on the back side of the cooler. There was ample room to the fender liner to fit the fan in there, no worries.

    Once the fan was in place, we removed both fog light assemblies. Good riddance to unnecessary bling - we don't have "fog" in Texas and their dead weight was covering up a good portion of two important oil coolers (engine and trans oil). We put together the wiring for the fan quickly. This included a relay and fuse for the higher current fan circuit, and a switch under the dash for the "low power" side of the relay. There was an unused 12V switched circuit in the factory fuse panel under the hood, right above the cooler & fan.

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    Total costs: About $100 for all of the parts, about 2-3 hours of time (possibly more if you are not familiar with removing bodywork and doing 12 volt wiring).

    Another open track event was run the following weekend (same track, same format, same ambient temps; (BMWCCA at ECR). This showed the results we wanted to see - ZERO trans temp problems and improved lap times. At the end of each 20 minute lapping session the new trans cooler fan was run for several minutes while the engine sat at idle, and heat was POURING out of the heat exchanger - so the fan was definitely moving some air, and helping.

    I guess we can chalk this on up as a successful mod. Here's the step-by-step install guide picture gallery: [url]http://vorshlag.smugmug.com/gallery/6321704_Wm79c[/url]

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    We will go back and add a new/improved duct to the trans cooler (sheet aluminum), as well as make some protective mesh coverings for both fog light openings soon. I will update this thread when we add those final bits.

    EDIT: Foglight removal could be considered STU legal if you interpret the front bumper cover rule the way we have. This class allows the entire front bumper cover to be modified or replaced. Why wouldn't this cover the fog lights? If the rules need to be reworded to clarify this aspect one way or another, we would encourage the STAC and SEB to do so. As many ST* racers have argued in other threads on this forum, GLASS FOGLIGHTS SHATTER when hit by cones, and become an expensive to replace and unsafe on-course liability (broken glass) when they break. From weighing we've done on foglights removed from our BMW M3 and this EVO, their removal nets a fairly negligible weight savings of .8 to 1.5 pounds per side. Remember: this is a class that allows tens of thousands of dollars of modifications, and this was zero cost mod done for safety and reliability.

    Cheers,

    Fair
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    20 Nov 2008 07:50 PM

    [U]Update: First autocross write-up - the last event on stock suspension![/U]

    Amy and Terry (me) ran the EVO in its first autocross event last weekend at Le Grave Field in Ft. Worth, TX. Sure is easy to take this car to events - hop in, drive there, air up the front tires, and race! No tire swapping, no loading truck and trailer, just go - very nice compared to our normal load the truck + trailer + car +tools + trackside junk process.

    The early cold temps warmed up considerably and we were borrowing water to spray the overheating Dunlop Star Specs on on the front after the 2nd runs (5 runs each w/ 2 drivers). The rears just barely got up to temp (55-60°F ambient). The stock suspensioned EVO X was a [I]huge marshmallow [/I]but it was still[B] two tons of fun to drive![/B] The only mod on the car - the [B]245mm Dunlop Star Spec tires[/B] - was the biggest contributor to these DL-1 data logged numbers (98% percentile, not peaks):

    Lateral Grip: 1.00g (left) / 1.04g (right)
    Braking: 0.98 g
    Accel: 0.60g

    The numbers were still pretty good, considering the MASSIVE pitch, roll, drive and camber loss the under-sprung stock suspension allows. It was hilarious!

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    [I]Look at the massive lean in Cornering![/I]

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    [I]Accel and Braking made for big pitch and dive![/I]

    It was like driving a big parade float... except it had a LOT of acceleration, good brakes, and the auto shifting S-Sport mode was FLAWLESS. The car would use 3rd and 1st gears where no other racers dared shift, and the data logging shows seamless acceleration during upshifts where our manually shifted cars always have a big dip in speed and acceleration. The SST magic is NOT A JOKE - this semi-automatic dual clutch business is the Real Thing. You never have to even THINK about shifting, don't even have to flick the paddles, you just mash the throttle and it is ALWAYS in the right gear. Amy and I were both Left Foot Braking everywhere, and it helped considerably.

    The course had a heavy emphasis on slaloms (3), but the stock EVO gobbled them up with ease. The active yaw control system seems to actually work - you have to be somewhat violent with the wheel but it sticks better than you would think. There were some long sweeping corners that the car didn't like so much, due to the lean and camber loss, and we lost a lot of time there to other cars and classes we gauge by. The maximum 1.02 g avg lateral grip number is pretty low for STU cars on 140-200 treadwear tires, as we usually see 1.15-1.3g lateral in our prepped STU and STS cars. The braking numbers are OK, about what we saw in our STS prepped E30 and the old STU classed STI, but nothing like the 1.1g braking we saw in our STU E36 M3. Even with massive 2-piece rotors and Brembo calipers, you can't make up for that much dive.

    The acceleration was pretty impressive, considering this thing is still bone stock and pushing 3600 pounds of puddin' around. The slower corner exits were helped dramatically by the SST's use of 1st gear. Due to a weird starting [I]light [/I]placement that occurred in a braking zone right before a corner, far away from the actual starting [I]line[/I], we didn't mess with launch control as it would have been pointless.

    With two driver's using LFB we assumed we might be adding extra heat to the transmission so the custom trans cooler fan was used between each run. With 2 drivers in a somewhat small run heat we were a bit pressed for time, but we did manage 4-5 minutes between drivers to swap numbers, spray the front tires, swap data cards for the DL-1, adjust the seat, and give the trans time to cool. It never had a single fault or overtemp warning, so that problem seems to be licked, even with heavy LFB use. Glad we had removed the fog lights and housings, as another EVO X driver attested to their fragility - one cone and [I]POW [/I]they're gone (mounting tabs on the housings can break easily). We will not have that problem, of course. Although Amy did have some cone issues...

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    The car is very wide, much wider than her M3, and she took a few runs to gauge the corners of the EVO

    As you can see the other, prepped STU cars didn't have as much lean or dive, but they were already on stiffer aftermarket suspensions.

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    L: Jason McCall in Paul's 2005 STI (KWs; this car has trophied at Nat's). Right: Jason hopping into another STU prepped EVO X GSR

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    This is the last time this car will have this much lean!

    ---------results---------

    I ended up 4th in STU in the stock EVO, .3 seconds back from Paul in 1st. The other 2 cars ahead were also prepped and driven by Nationally Competitive drivers, so we were happy with the EVO's performance, to say the least.

    [url]http://autocross.com/texasregion/[/url]

    1Tm STU 166 Paul Magyar Subaru STi Silver Dunlop [B]56.158 [/B] 56.101+2 56.409+1 57.112+1 56.470+1 56.158
    350983 Vorshlag Motorsports -
    2Tm STU 66 Jason McCall Subaru STi Silver Dunlop 58.474+DNF 56.390+2 56.015+1 [B]56.261[/B] 56.476+2 56.261
    358922 Vorshlag Motorsports 0.103
    3Tm STU 91 Wayne Atkins Honda Civic Si Black Bridgestone 57.545+1 57.479 56.423 [B]56.422 [/B] 56.261+2 56.422
    282424 Atkins Design Group, Inc. 0.161
    4 m STU 193 Terry Fair Evo Black Dunlop [B][COLOR="Red"]55.751[/COLOR][/B]+DNF 57.481+1 [B]56.440[/B] 56.855 56.636 56.440

    --------data analysis---------

    OK, lets discuss the magical "SST" transmission. Are the shifts as fast as they say? The data will tell us - we can compare 2-3 upshifts in a manual transmission car (our STU prepped E36 M3) vs 2-3 upshifts in the EVO X MR with the SST in Super-Sport auto mode, all data logged using the same DL1 system. These graphs say it all....

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    E36 M3 shift. This is time vs. mph. Red, purple and black runs all have a 2-3 shift.

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    Evo X MR, black line represents acceleration from 1st through 3rd (starting in middle of graph). Red is longitudinal acceleration.

    There was a cone in the middle of the section on the EVO data, hence the dip in acceleration, but its not by much. Speed peaked at 65mph. Possibly the two flat parts are from the upshifts, but it is a little hard to tell since this data is on an autocross run and not a straight line, ruling out other variables. Regardless [I]the car never stops accelerating [/I]and the slope of the curve only changes slightly. It has no dip in the speed vs time graph like the M3 does on an upshift. The EVO took advantage of the SST auto mode to do multiple up and downshifts where other racers stuck it out in 2nd gear only. Advantage: EVO MR.

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    (click to see video of data logging of Terry vs. Amy)

    That's the screen capture of the DL1 data showing Terry's (me) vs Amy's best runs. There is a 2 sec difference - we're normally only a tenth or two apart. She has the 2 Nat'l Win/Championships in STU-L. Basically I'm faster everywhere and braking later, but I tend to do well when you need to drive a sloppy car violently like this. Once we get the floppy chassis settled down with a real suspension, the gap should narrow back to nothing.

    [url]http://vorshlag.smugmug.com/gallery/4882794_PPm2C#419430180_6dMyn-M-LB[/url]

    ----------up next---------------

    The AST 4200 double adjustable shocks are already here and the last EVO X camber plate part we need is due later this week. We've got a gaggle of exhaust parts here too, so we'll begin the custom 3" after-cat system tomorrow night.

    Fair
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    20 Nov 2008 07:58 PM

    [U]Update: Mesh Foglight Opening Covers, Nov 18, 2008[/U]

    A previous cooling mod (see posts above) left the EVO X MR's two foglight openings now completely unobstructed - begging to ingest a rock or giant bug into the pricey and essential engine and transmission oil coolers that nestle inside the front bumper cover. With track events on the schedule anything can happen if there's an "off", and our local tracks do have some rocks when you (or someone else in front of you) get off pavement. We regularly see gravel and debris slung on track and Hanchey was holding his breath at the last ECR event that none of that made its way into the oil coolers.

    This project was undertaken by Brian to put some protective mesh in place of the foglights, which allow unrestricted airflow but will stop a rock or other foreign object larger than 1/4" diameter. He ordered some stainless steel "rock protection" grill mesh - he used [I]#4 Mesh/Extra Course[/I] from HRP World (24"x36" sheet was $35). This gave us enough mesh to do the foglight openings on the EVO and the main radiator inlet + two brake duct openings on our LS1 powered BMW E36. Keeping rocks off the SST trans cooler on the EVO X MR was the reason for project. We removed the foglights and factory ducting from both sides when doing the SST cooling fan mod, shown above.

    The mesh is stiff and holds it shape, yet still bends and cuts easily. Its stainless steel but we painted it semi-flat black to somewhat match the factory grill mesh. We didn't put it on a 45° angle like the stock stuff, but hey, its close enough and the final project still looks damn good in person.

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    [I](click all pictures to see larger versions)[/I]

    Of course we "cheated" and used the lift to make the work easier. First step once you have the car in the air is to remove the two plastic lower engine cover panels for access to the back of the bumper cover - there's no need to remove bumper cover from the car for this project. There's about 1.7 million screws and snap clips hold these two panels in place.

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    Each side uses approximately one rectangle that is 18" wide by 8" tall. You can go a little smaller, but there's plenty of room behind the bumper cover, so be conservative and make em larger. Use a black "Sharpie" marker to draw a line on the mesh then cut - You'll need a good pair of tin snips to cut it.

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    Above, left - Hanchey test fitting the mesh before painting and final attachment. At above, right the painted mesh is secured to the factory threaded stand-offs for the foglight assemblies. #8 x 3/4" long button head Phillips drive sheet metal screws threaded into the stand-offs to hold the mesh in place. Brian made some large, square surface washers to spread the load of the screw head over the surface of the mesh.

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    You can see the mesh in these photos above - the hand is there for contrast to show the black color. The stainless steel look would be OK if the factory grill mesh weren't black.

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    The final mesh covers secured before the lower engine cover panels are replaced.

    OK, onto the exhaust...

    Fair
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    20 Nov 2008 08:01 PM

    [U]Update: Custom, Lightweight after-cat Exhaust Project (Part 1)[/U]

    We plan on using the COBB Tuning downpipe, O2 housing and cat, but we wanted to make a lightweight after-cat exhaust ourselves... we have the tools... we have the technology... [I]The Six Million Dollar Exhaust is born![/I]

    OK, so its really only about a $200 Exhaust, but who's counting? Unlike most of the off-the-shelf offerings out there (which are still few and far between for the new EVO X) we wanted to get a lightweight system with a low buck, home brew solution. No, its not titanium, or even stainless, but it is thin-wall 20 gauge (.049" wall thickness) carbon steel tubing with smooth 3" diameter mandrel bends, sourced from SPD Exhaust. We've built systems for our race cars before using SPD bends and they are very, very high quality. Not cheap, but you won't find thin walled 20 gauge bends for less (the cheaper bends are all .065" wall, or thicker).

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    We used three of the 45° mandrel bends (SPD 3" ID, 4" bend radius, .049" wall thickness = thin and light), 3' of straight pipe (3" ID, SPD .049" wall) and the two mufflers shown. The U-bend and 4th mandrel 45° were not used. Since the SPD parts come from California and have a 3-4 day lead time, we ordered everything in advance and got a few extra bends, just in case. The mufflers were 3" ID low cost DynoMax "straight through" units bought from Summit Racing (you don't get much cheaper than that). And instead of the uber-light system we built for the BMW E30, which is [I]LOUD AS HELL[/I] (16 pounds for cat + exhaust + muffler), Brian chose a larger case 3" chamber main muffler + resonator for this multi-purpose daily driver/autocross/track car. And instead of a simple dump after the rear axle, this system runs all the way to the factory rear exhaust outlet opening. The main muffler came in at 10.8 pounds and the resonator at 5.2 - the muffler is heavier than we like, so we might go back and add a flange and section of pipe to allow for quick swapping of the muffler with a lighter weight "straight pipe", to drop 10 pounds and lose more back-pressure for race use.

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    First step (after sourcing all of the parts) was to get the car in the air and yank the stock after-cat exhaust system off. This took literally about 90 seconds once the isolators were loose - its too easy when you have a lift. A tip for faster removal - lube all of the rubber exhaust hanger isolators with WD40 (shown above, left) and then the three exhaust hangers will pop right out. A little leverage with a prybar helps if they are stuck on.

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    Once the [B]factory after-cat exhaust [/B]is off, its straight to our trusty 150 pound digital scale (+/- 0.1 lbs). I delicately balanced it on the flange with the lightest touch, and the system tipped the scales at [B]45.1 pounds[/B]. Our goal was to drop at least 20 pounds in this portion of the exhaust upgrade. The stock system is shown above, on the left.

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    We started at the OEM flange at the back of the catalyst and worked our way back. An aftermarket 2-bolt 3" ID exhaust flange was bolted up to the stock cat flange and then the system was started from there. A 3' section of straight pipe was followed by the resonator, then another 3' section of pipe (later cut down a bit). Our hydraulic transmission jack worked well as an adjustable height exhaust stand. Both the 3" ID resonator and muffler allowed for a slip-fit to the 3" tubing, which gave us 2-3" of wiggle room as these joints could each be slide in and out by that much. You can see above that one of the 45° bends was cut in half and extended in the middle to give a slight jog laterally and another jog downwards, to clear the rear diff housing. Once it was all laid out where I liked it, each section was tacked together.

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    OK, everything is tacked in place. Neglected to get a good picture of the system installed in the car at this stage, of course. Work up to this point took 2.5 hours - that is fully laid out, tacked-together and ready to final weld. That's where we stopped last night and I'm heading out the shop to finish the welding. Once its welded up we'll re-fit it one last time and add the exhaust hangers (oops!) then remove it again for JetHot thermal coating.

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    Here's the new exhaust on the scale and laid up next to the stock system. The new bits are weighing in at 23.8 pounds, so we've got a pre-coated savings of 21.3 pounds. Big thanks to DaveB for help during the entire fabrication!

    More soon once I finish weld the exhaust and get it coated. Our new EVO X camber plate parts are days away, and the AST 4200s are sitting on the shelf...

    Fair
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    22 Nov 2008 07:47 PM

    [U]Exhaust update: Too Quiet?![/U]

    Well we got the exhaust finish welded and prettied up and then fire the engine... too quiet!?! Yep the MagnaFlow 3-chamber "straight-thru" is just too efficient and was about the same volume as stock. Part of the reasoning behind our lightweight exhaust was so we could actually hear the engine note, to help with shifting when in manual mode (as it is now we have to watch the tach - deathly silent).

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    [I]L: On the car with the massive MagnaFlow R: Seam welds ground down for coating[/I]

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    [I]L: After driving the car for a short stint the steel turned bronze colored R: outlet is on left side only[/I]

    So now we're going to make an interchangeable straight pipe to replace the (11 pound!) MagnaFlow for track events. Then we can change it out quickly at the track for more engine noise and power. :) Ordering some 3" V-bands and will knock out this new optional piece, then get all of it coated. This way we can also dyno with and without the muffler quickly...

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    [I]L: Brian's EvoX at the Cobb Show. R: Vorshlag Test Pilot Mark Berry's EVO 9 weighs 2320 pounds![/I]

    Pics from a car show today, at the Cobb Tuning grand opening in Plano, TX. More: [url]http://vorshlag.smugmug.com/gallery/6623846_gJkMg[/url]

    More soon,

    hancheyb
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    22 Dec 2008 03:02 PM

    Wanted to do a quick update on the Evo. We're waiting on rear top mounts to test with the rear suspension, but we had enough time on Friday afternoon to get the fronts on. By "we" I mean "me", Fair was hiding selling something or designing something so he said. Gosh! ha!

    We installed our new camber plate and AST 4200 double adjustable shocks. For this first install we used Hyperco 7", 450 lb, 60mm ID springs. Not sure where we'll end up but that's where we'll start. AST 4200s are monotube, nitrogen charged dampers. They run the same components (piston, shims, etc) as the higher level 4300s that cost $2,000 more. This set in particular is designed to be internally adjustable so we don't catch as many TT points. A future set of 4200RR (remotes) might be installed for testing at a later time.

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    The spring perch was moved up to almost seat with the spring platform when installed. This lowered the car approximately 1" from stock. I didn't want to lower it too much with stock height still in the rear. We'll finalize various spring height combinations depending on what dealers and customers ask for. Yes, we're aware of driving with such drastically different rates and how that affects handling, ride, etc. This is just to test fitment, etc. We'll put the package together and head out to the track over the holidays if all goes smoothly.

    The camber plates had our typical range of just over 2.0 degrees of change per side. I didn't get to check caster yet, but we did design it to provide stock caster and one adjustment for more caster. With the strut eccentric maxed out the car sat with -1.2° of camber and maxed out at -3.3° of camber. Since the eccentric gives you some range we will probably change the camber plate to have a final max of -4.5° and then -2.3° or so. If you change the eccentric bolt then you can get back into the stock spec range. The other side of the car had the bolt minimized and it was only at -0.9°. So you can see we have a large enough range to give you street and track setups. No one ever runs as much camber as we do, but we've seen situations where some tire/surface combinations require it. Usually it is for autocrossing, and this car will be doing that as well.

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    I drove the car over the weekend, granted all the testing was street driving on 5 clicks from full soft rebound, 0 on compression. We have 12 clicks total rebound and 12 clicks compression. The car rode extremely well passing the "spouse test" with flying colors. She had no idea anything had changed on the car which is what we were shooting for. That likely means we can go higher in rates helping some of that lean in the 3600 pound Evo.

    Here's where it sits at the moment. Lowering the front really helps visibility. The Evo sits up so high, us shorter torso folk can't see over the huge, flat hood. :)


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    We'll have a followup on our tuning day at Cobb Tuning last week. We're testing the Access Port on our MR, one of the first MRs that Cobb has tuned.

    Fair
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    22 Dec 2008 05:55 PM
    One more benefit - this mod is also making the car lighter:

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    [I][B]19.4 pounds[/B] for the OEM strut, spring and top mount[/I]

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    [I][B]13.1 pounds [/B]for the AST 4200, Hyperco spring and Vorshlag camber-caster plate[/I]

    Nice 12+ pound drop of unsprung weight off the front axle. :)
    Fair
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    29 Dec 2008 03:30 PM
    Dyno testing for the baseline setup and First Dyno Tune at Cobb Tuning. The EVO still has the completely stock exhaust and otherwise is "as delivered" from the dealer.

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    [I]click to enlarge[/I]


    +50 whp peak and more power everywhere. Car already felt good at all engine speeds but feels amazingly good now. 8)
    Fair
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    09 Jan 2009 07:06 PM
    [SIZE="4"]Lightweight Battery install[/SIZE]

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    [I]Left: OEM battery. Right: The Deka ETX18L we used instead[/I]

    A common autocrosser/track trick to lose weight from a car is to use a lightweight AGM style battery in place of the stock unit, when allowed. The Original Equipment batteries used in most modern cars (which can range from 35-55 pounds) are usually a cheap lead-acid wet cell battery, spec'd to work in extreme hot/cold and to have a lot of reserve power - so you can leave your lights or hazard indicators on for a long time and still be able to start a car at -30°F. With smart use in "engine off" situations, racers can deal with a bit less reserve power and we tend to use much lighter, high cranking amp mini-batteries that are made for motorcycles.

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    The Absorbed Gas Mat (AGM) style batteries can deal with more vibraiton and do not de-gas (Hydrogen) like a standard wet lead-acid battery, and they tend to work better in racing environments. We've used many brands over the years but have noticed that a lot of the higher cost names are just rebadged batteries made by a select few battery manufacturers. The Deka AGM battery we picked for the EVO X is one we've used in a number of our other cars, including our V8 powered BMW. They work well for the relatively mild winters and hot summer weather we see here in Texas (15°F to 105°) and usually last 2-3 years of street/track/autocross use. A $10 low amperage trickle charger (a "battery tender") is a good idea if the car sits for more than 5 days or so without being used.

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    The factory battery mount was surprisingly versatile and simple (stock design used J-hooks that you can get at AutoZone!) and with little more than a spacer block (with a shaped cutout to grab the narrower Deka) it worked great and took all of 15 minutes to swap in. I'm not showing the spacer up close and no, we are not going to be selling this part. Yes, it will even pass a tech inspection - something most homemade battery mounts rarely do. ;)

    This Deka battery cost about $78 and the Werker SAE top post adapters (automotive style brass posts that convert a motorcycle battery for automotive use) were another $9. So for about $90 we dropped another ~17 pounds from the car. Yes, it removes weight off the rear, but we always go for the lightest legal class weight at all costs (esp. on this [I]heavy [/I]EVO!) rather than strive for the "perfect weight balance" by adding weight (which is [I]not [/I]beneficial). Car started great and has been working fine for street use.

    Cheers,
    Fair
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    09 Jan 2009 07:06 PM
    We finally got the spherical rear shock mounts in from AST for the EVO X and installed the 4200 rear shocks yesterday (the fronts went on a while back with our alloy steel Vorshlag spherical camber/caster plates). Both Hanchey and I have driven the car around extensively now (test loop, street driving) with the 4200s on front and back, and its awesome. We'll tweak a few things then put these into production - and we already have a brand new shock design (upcoming 5100/5200 series ASTs) planned for testing on this car very soon.

    We are scrambling to line up a track day to test 4200 shock settings, spring rates, alignment tweaks, etc. Brian wants to change the base rebound valving on the fronts before we hit the track, then we're ready.

    Full gallery of AST / EVO X installation pics: [url]http://vorshlag.smugmug.com/gallery...;/url]

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    [I]These are the ride heights were are happiest with. No droop travel was lost at these heights.[/I]

    Of course we rated the OEM rear springs (some goofy tapered/progressive Eibach spring). It was variable rate 160-215 #/in, and we used a 550 #/in rate for initial testing. [I]The car rides better than stock[/I] with the compression valving turned down. The OEM shocks it came with are garbage - one of them is already leaking, at 6000 miles, and they have zero compression damping and too much rebound. Its not hard to improve handling over this stuff, even with nearly 3X the stock spring rate. :p
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    [I]Better picture of the Vorshlag camber-caster plates (pre-production) add positive caster and negative camber adjustment[/I]

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    [I]Our front spring package allows the lower spring perch to sit above the tire (lots more room inboard)[/I]

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    [I]Setting rear ride height (left) then locking down the lower perch (right)[/I]

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    [I]Left: Stock rear shock assembly = 12.6 lbs. Right: AST 4200 rear was 9.1 lbs[/I]

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    [I]Rear rebound knobs are accessible with the forward plastic trunk bulkhead removed, but we'll add remote cable adjusters for easier access instead[/I]

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    [I]Like up front, the rear shock's Compression adjuster knob is at the bottom. Its easy to reach if you lean down and reach behind the tire - enabling fast/pit stop valving adjustments[/I]

    We'll post up with more data once we get this car on track with the DL-1 onboard.

    Cheers,
    RX7 KLR
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    09 Jan 2009 07:55 PM
    While you are working on saving weight you might want to drain that washer bottle. ;)
    Fair
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    13 Jan 2009 02:11 PM

    RX7 KLR wrote:
    While you are working on saving weight you might want to drain that washer bottle. ;)

    Hey, that is carefully calculated "moving ballast", man! Think: DTM. [:P]

    -------------------

    [B]Lightweight Race Exhaust, Ver 2.0[/B]

    After hearing how quiet our first "race" exhaust ended up at, and with the main muffler gobbling up a bit more weight than we liked, I went back and re-made the lightweight after cat exhaust on the EVO X. This is just a one-off exhaust we made for our shop car and not something we're going to mass produce or market, so its not exactly pretty but it is functional. The system is pieced together with thin wall 3" carbon steel exhaust tubing and mandrel bent bends from SPD Exhaust. We picked up a few V-band clamp assemblies from them for this version as well.

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    The first step was cutting off the rear section in front of the main (rearmost) muffler we added, with an eye for the added clearance room around the to the rear subframe (1/4" is enough). I tacked the clamp to the now "mid-pipe" section (shown above) and mocked up the exhaust with the muffler on the car and tacked that end in place.

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    [I]The rear muffler section weighs 12.9 pounds and is now removable.[/I]

    We then added a hanger to the back of the mid-pipe (bolting to one of the many chassis bracing points) and then made a new rear section to take the place of the muffler, and added an additional V-band stub and mount to that end. Everything fit great and it sounded a LOT better. The entire race exhaust (sans muffler) is now 16 pounds after the cat.

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    [I]The "Race" version was mocked up. This rear section weighs just 4.5 pounds and is a bit louder.[/I]

    Brian drove the car around for a day with the race setup, loved it, and now its removed for coating. Building another setup like this for a 2008 STI this week (Paul's STU car) and we'll get that one coated as well.

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    An extra 45° bend and a short length of 3" straight pipe + a V-band and a little bit of work, so wasn't much more money, and now we have a dual purpose, reconfigurable lightweight race/street exhaust. Thanks to Paul for helping with the version 2 work.

    CDeutsch
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    17 Jan 2009 03:45 PM

    Awesome thread! Thanks for sharing.

    Any thoughts on how the MR will stack up against the current STU cars?

    Will the weight be too much to overcome?

    Fair
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    12 Feb 2009 02:58 PM
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    We took two STU prepped cars to a recent concrete site event, our first for the year. Saturday was a test-n-tune where we setup these and some other Vorshlag/AST test cars. We even changed springs and revalved shocks before the event Sunday on a few. The EVO X now has AST 4200s and Dunlops + the 2008 STI with AST 4200s and Dunlops, and both COBB tuned and with Vorshlag custom after-cat exhausts (lightweight and loud).

    Results from this event: [url]http://www.tamscc.org/forum/showthread.php?t=9461[/url]

    Our own Brian Hanchey and Amy Fair both co-drove the EVO X while Paul M drove the STI, all against other Texas STU talent including GD Subarus, E46 M3s, and even a Mustang GT (the GT and M3 were in another class for this event). We had a great "constant" in Andy Hollis' STS Honda to compare to as well.

    Long story short: The EVO X won STU. The entire "SSM" field of 26 cars also fell to the EVO (including Corvettes and other cars with equal tires and much looser rules/prep). Brian was playing around with settings and techniques on his last 2 runs, as his 2nd run had everyone in the class covered. For its first autocross with non-stock suspension we were very pleased, and we're about to add COBB bars and more front spring rate, plus a brand new inverted front strut setup. The 08 STI did very well on its maiden event also, trailing the EVO and just nipping at the heels of another 07 STI, which was fully STU prepped with Ohlins. The data logging we did on the EVO and STI showed them to be very close in lateral grip and braking (1.10 to 1.15g in both) but the speed variations of this tight course kept the SST transmission dancing between 1st and 3rd gears, which was probably what made the difference and the win. In "S-Sport mode" the MR is never outside of the peak powerband, EVER. Its just so damn EASY to drive these cars at 10/10ths.

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    We also had AST equipped cars win STX (me driving a BMW E36 328is) and STS2 (Miata), so it was a great season opener weekend. We will be doing more events at this site (Texas A&M Riverside Annex), as its WWII era concrete is probably as close to Lincoln, Nebraska as we'll get this close to Dallas.

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    [I]The black high temp coating on the custom EVO X exhaust came out looking grea[/I]

    The engine tuning done by COBB is paying off, as recent "side by side acceleration tests" against a similarly prepped 08 STI and an E46 M3 were total blowouts in the EVO X.
    P. Lier
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    12 Feb 2009 03:14 PM

    So Terry are you bringing that BAD BOY ;) to the 2009 OLOA. Also what about the 2009 Grassroots Ultimate Track Car Challenge. 

     

    Peter

    Fair
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    13 Feb 2009 11:37 AM
    P. Lier wrote:

    So Terry are you bringing that BAD BOY ;) to the 2009 OLOA. Also what about the 2009 Grassroots Ultimate Track Car Challenge.

    Peter

    Yes, we'd like to make it to OLOA in the Evo (still rounding up sponsorship) but this car is far too slow for UTCC. [;)] For the GRM event we're either going to bring our LS1 powered BMW or just tag along with one of our customers, that has a GT1 car.

    Fair
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    15 Feb 2009 06:12 PM
    [QUOTE]When are you going to test the bars? I am assuming you will use both front and rear. Will be interesting to see how you like them with the coilover set up. Have you thought of a rear bar upgrade only to start?

    After looking at all of the many options available, Hanchey just contacted Cobb about anti sway bars and we'll likely go pick them up this week (along with their high flow catalyst). We're going to put them on the front for sure and probably both ends soon.

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    [I]Left: Rear bar looks easy to change. Right: Front bar = notsomuch[/I]

    The front bar doesn't look like fun to remove/replace on the EVO X but even with 450F/550R #/in spring rates it still needs help with roll control. We are going to up the front spring rate as well before doing one final test, then taking the entire suspension off and sending it to a magazine for one of their test cars. We have a new setup (5000 series Inverted ASTs) coming for our EVO to test with very soon. We're already testing 5100, 5200 and 5300 inverted shocks on a number of cars and the testing is going VERY well. We should have 5100s on the shelf for the EVO 8/9 and EVO X soon.

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    OasisTan
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    15 Feb 2009 08:51 PM
    Wow, nice looking coilovers and camber plates!!!!! ;-)
    hancheyb
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    04 Mar 2009 01:58 PM
    The Vorshlag Crew had a fun filled track test day on Tuesday. A magazine we work with was in the Austin area working on a Tech article, so we had asked them to drive the Vorshlag EVO X for a possible future article. They finished up their testing on time and had Tuesday morning free. Our good friend, Andy Hollis, is a member at the new Harris Hill Road country club track in San Marcos. We had a magazine writer, a track, and a car. Road trip!

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    [I]Left: The magazine tester talks with Andy. Right: Heading out on course
    [/I]

    Seeing as the EVO build is supposed to be a "do-it-all" project, we decided to make the 251 mile drive down there in the EVO versus trailering it down there. We've had the Dunlop Star Specs on it for a while - they are doing fine and wearing well, with several track days, many autocrosses, and 6000 street miles. They are a great tire if you want to "do it all".

    We left Dallas at 5:30AM, arrived 5 minutes late in San Marcos at 10:05, unloaded the car and got started. The EVO's onboard GPS Navigation led us directly there (for once). We had added Cobb sway bars to the car last week and had not tested with them on yet. Also, we didn't have time to set the camber trackside for the initial drive by the magazine writer, as his schedule was pretty tight. It wasn't really crucial since this was just a brief test drive. We weren't trying to set fastest lap (yet) - more on that in a bit. After a brief photo shoot, airing up the tires and removing our wares from the car, we were off. The car was a little pushy for our liking, but there wasn't time to really dial the car in for him.

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    [I]The Harris Hill Road course has excellent pavement, big elevation changes, and lots of room[/I]

    Everything went well and the comments were positive concerning the ride quality and handling. Keep in mind it has to be daily driven, autocrossed, and track driven which is a challenge in the EVO. We were a little disappointed that the car didn't handle up to our track standards out of the box, although it wasn't a surprise. We had not had the chance to get on the track since getting the AST 4200 suspension installed plus the new Cobb bars. We had autocrossed it with the ASTs, but that is a complete different driving style and camber/shock setup. After the magazine writer had left we put in several additional sessions in the EVO, playing with camber & toe, shock settings, tire pressures and sway bar settings. We were able to get most of the push out and the car was extremely neutral when the tires were cool. In a few laps the weight of the EVO just overpowered the narrow 245mm tires. We know it would improve considerably with 275mm rubber. When the tires overheated it would push, and the DL-1 data showed it in lap times. It would slow down a second or more after the first few laps. We saw as high as 1.21g lateral and 1.12g under braking, however, even with the skinny tires.

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    [I]These pictures were with the "street" camber of -2°. It got a lot faster at -4°[/I]

    Thanks to Chris Fleming at Cobb Tuning of Plano, who helped source new Hawk DTC-70 brake pads for the track testing and helped with the swaybar install at their shop. With these new pads braking on track was MUCH improved. Even though you're not supposed to drive them on the street, we took the car down there with the track pads on it. We just made sure our stops were all hard and fast on the highway, hehe.

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    [I]The horses in the background liked the EVO's exhaust note[/I]

    You can see in the pictures the car still has some body roll. We plan to go up in spring rates to help combat this. It rides so well now that I'm confident we can revalve the shocks, go up in spring rate, and still maintain good ride quality. We asked the track management what a good time at Harris Hill was for their clockwise 1.8 mile course. They said in a street car a 1:35 is fast, anything 1:30 or less is really fast. By the end of the day we were running 1:30 laps according to our data logger. We were happy with the results and know there's more time in it, especially with properly sized track wheels/tires. We'll be running it at a NASA Time Trial event in two weeks and a BMW Club event after that, so we'll make some tweaks and go back for more. Stay tuned!

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    [I]Fair in the Miata: "Its a bit different than driving our V8 powered BMW..."[/I]

    As a nice bonus, H2R let Terry drive their club's track prepped Miata (NB). It was equipped one of our competitor's coilovers on it so it was nice to get an on-track comparison. He was "just going to do a lap or two" on the almost corded race tires, but had a blast and stayed out lap after lap. Of course he said it needed better shocks, ha. Driving the lightened Miata on 225mm R compounds is "too easy", yet still lots of fun.

    The folks at Harris Hill were great and they have a fantastic Country Club road course and driver's facility. If anyone that lives near Austin or San Marcos hasn't been out there they need to look for a DE event there and go (and join - we were there on an open "member day" and had the place completely to ourselves!) We're thinking of renting the track in the future and coming down again to test with some AST customers - it was well worth the 3.5 hour drive from Dallas.
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