PrevPrev Go to previous topic
NextNext Go to next topic
Last Post 21 Oct 2009 02:57 PM by  Cr0usEEE
What gears in your tow vehicle?
 9 Replies
Sort:
You are not authorized to post a reply.
Author Messages
BrianCunningham
New Member
New Member
Posts:


--
20 Oct 2009 06:20 AM
    You guys opting for the 4.11's (or deeper)?

    Which really sucks the gas down in normal driving.

    or just use the LOW 2wd position in a 4x4
    Stan Whitney
    New Member
    New Member
    Posts:


    --
    20 Oct 2009 08:00 AM
    3.73's in the last 2 Ford's. Taller tire this time (34-35") which seems to dig into the mileage a bit.
    anon
    New Member
    New Member
    Posts:


    --
    20 Oct 2009 08:11 AM

    I assume by 'LOW 2wd position' you're referring to the transfer case gear selections in most 4x4 trucks. It's called a transfer case (TC) because it transfers power to the front axle AND the rear axle. It used to be very standard that any 4x4 truck TC would also have an integral 2-speed range box - a Hi gear range for most driving situations, and a Low gear range (usually 2:1 or higher) for serious off-road or pulling situations - like full grain hoppers or other heavy ag situations for farmers.

    When the transfer case is in Low range in most normal 1/2 to 1 ton pickup trucks/SUVs I'm familiar with, the engine is at the RPM redline at around 30-40 mph. They're supplying the needed torque to pull a heavy load (without excessive Auto trans fluid heat & torque converter slippage, or Manual trans clutch slippage), but forget about pulling for a long distance at highway speeds - ya can't get 'em that fast.

    A lot of the more modern push-button light-duty All-Wheel-Drive trucks/SUVs no longer have the 2-speed range box.

    Medium duty trucks (450/550/650/Kodiak/Top-Kick, etc) are a different matter. Rear axles with internal gear range selection are available, or after-transmission overdrive/'gear splitters' are made, so you can shift from 1-Lo -> 1-Hi -> 2-Lo -> 2-Hi ...and so on. But these trucks usually aren't 4x4s.

    The smallest rear axle ratio I've seen commonly available from Ford/Dodge/Chevy in towing-rated trucks is in the 3.50s, with a lower weight capacity. 3.73s and 4.10s are more common and feature higher weight capacities....but lower fuel economy.

    Read the manufacturer's tow ratings for each unique body/frame/engine/transmission/axle ratio combination carefully, because there's a bunch of differences in the tow ratings.

    47CP
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Posts:2740


    --
    20 Oct 2009 09:15 AM

    3.54 in my old 2001 Dodge Diesel, 3.73 in both my 02 Ford and 06 RAM Diesels. Worked great. Diesel fuel economy seems to drop hard above 2k RPMS, and they all had plenty of power to pull my 24' enclosed below that RPM. I can see where a fully loaded trailer might make the 4.10 or 4.30 nice, but with the 2k RPM thing, it would really cut into mileage.

    My E350 Van with v10 came with 3.55. This totally sucked for towing. You could never get into OD and dropped into 2nd a LOT. I switched to 4.10 and it is much better, holding OD on flat ground with trailer, 3rd pulling good for everything else. I would have done a 4.30 or 4.56, but the van ECU's don't allow that much adjustment. I don't have a before/after for empty mileage, but it pulled down and average of 16.6 on a trip from St. Louis to Vegas in February and it was stuffed to the gills with stuff (65 flip top plastic boxes full of apparel) That seemed pretty good to me, especially in the winter and through the mountains.

    DaveW

    Joe_914
    Advanced Member
    Advanced Member
    Posts:790


    --
    20 Oct 2009 11:40 AM
    3.73 in my 2000 Ford 7.3L Diesel. Way more truck than I need and I love every minute of it.
    CHRISFP78
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Posts:495


    --
    20 Oct 2009 12:25 PM
    3.73,s rollin on 20's
    Bobzilla
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Posts:1120


    --
    20 Oct 2009 02:13 PM
    3.42 on ours, with the small V8. killer mileage unloaded (21-24mpg) and decent loaded on flat ground. It will struggle a little in the mountains, but no more than I'm pulling it's not much to worry about IMO. Deeper trans pan, external trans cooler, engine oil cooler. Trailer and car are a little over 3k lbs.
    wrchas
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Posts:232


    --
    21 Oct 2009 10:28 AM
    3.73 on my '01 Ford 7.3L diesel. I've never wished for a 4.10 but I have wondered what a 3.55 rear gear would tow like. The RX-7 on my open trailer is like a litte toy for the truck.
    Steve Hoelscher
    Advanced Member
    Advanced Member
    Posts:831


    --
    21 Oct 2009 11:14 AM

    My van came with the non-tow pack 3.31. It was adequate for my 3500 lbs car/trailer combo (and an additional 500~1000 lbs of stuff inside the van) but the moderate ups and downs you experience in the southeastern US meant I was dropping out of OD more than I would have preferred. I looked at gear charts and switched to the 3.55 factory option tow gear and found it nearly perfect. It pulls OD for everything but more signifcant climbs and cruises effortlessly at 75~80+ mph.

    Note that your optimum R&P ratio will be determined by where your engine makes its peak torque and the OD of the tire. My van is a 5 liter with peak torque in the 2200 rpm range and a 235/75-15 tire.

    Cr0usEEE
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Posts:298


    --
    21 Oct 2009 02:57 PM
    My 08 Tundra came stock with a 4.30...and thats the only option you get with the big 5.7 liter V8.
    You are not authorized to post a reply.


    Leroy Engineering Micro Button Sunoco 88x31 Button
    Woodhouse Motorsports
    SPS 88x31 Button G-Loc Button
    Vorshlag 88x31 Button

    Advertise on SCCAForums.com and reach thousands of visitors per day!

    SafeRacer FREE SHIPPING over $99

    Shop for Pirelli tires at Tire Rack. blank



    Sunoco Bottom 468x60 Banner