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Last Post 04 Jun 2015 11:04 AM by  SccaDaub
Getting New Trailer Tires
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toy4speed
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10 Apr 2014 04:16 PM

    Well, its that time again.  Every 3-4 yrs I change out tires on my enclosed car trailer, and the perplexing choice of tire brands comes up again.  I've read so many different reviews, various forums, and again my head just spins.  I guess with enough opinions, can find whatever answer you want.  I have used the U.S. made Goodyear Marathons in past (with good results), the China made Marathons (didn't know when I bought them, less positive results), Carlisle  tires (seemed to blow several), TowMaster tires (seemed ok results, although did blow one tire, but that was after over 10k miles).  I am inclined to get TowMasters again, for lack of other overwhelming choices.  There is a Maxxis brand, found some feedback on this tire, generally more expensive by about $40 a tire, more positive reviews that most, but somewhat smaller sample size.  I can't find if the Maxxis is a U.S. made tire, if so, I might spend the extra $$ to try em.  Maybe all trailer tires are now made in China?

    I travel with 2 fully mounted spares, and a extra unmounted tire, so the idea of a blowout and tire change is not the issue as much as possible damage to my trailer (or worse) during a blowout.  Its more a safety thing, trying to find a good tire.

    Its been some months since a trailer tire discussion.  After Mark's thread on the Kumhos, I briefly considered them, then moved on. 

    Any current thoughts?

    Don

    atcovan
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    14 Apr 2014 03:06 AM
    I guess the short answer is to run what you trust. My trailer came with 205's and I immediately bought American Marathons in the 225 size. Ran 80 lbs cold and had a pressure monitor. Never had any issues and got new tires at the 4 year mark. Any tire will fail if you overload, underinflate, or run over a nail.
    vreihen
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    15 Apr 2014 07:48 AM
    Some RV/camper owners swear by changing over to light truck tires, as the quality control is better. There are significant construction differences between the two types of tires, and arguments both ways on this. Since we have an open topic and members who are familiar with tire engineering, it would be good to hear their thoughts.....
    Jim G
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    15 Apr 2014 01:43 PM
    Based on trailer tire reviews on dozens of internet forums, one has to conclude that there are no good trailer tires made anywhere in the world.

    The bottom line is that trailer tires have to be replace fairly often, as you are doing. Also ensure that the tire isn't overloaded, tire pressures are checked before and during a long trip, the speed is kept to something reasonable, and the tires are stored out of the sunlight or with covers.

    Given all that, it probably doesn't matter what brand you purchase.


    Jim
    F125AXer
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    16 Apr 2014 10:58 PM

    Reality hit for me when I blew the third tire on my single-axle enclosed trailer.  Catastrophic failures, all, and two different brands.  The last one was only a year old!

    So the concept changed from "whose" to "specifications".

    Once I went in that direction, and decided that the standard "Load Range C" was too failure prone, I was hunting for a tire with a stronger construction.  That meant for me "Load Range D".  Not easy to find in the size the trailer uses.  What a difference that has made.

    There has been ONE flat tire since, attributed to a puncture in the corner of the tread.  The tire deflated.  It did NOT explode and shell the tread, as the others had, with little to no warning.  When choosing tires for your trailer, add up the total weight of the trailer and everything in/on it, then add up the total weight rating of all the tires.  They should not be at all close.  The total rating for the tires should IMO, at least exceed the actual weight by 50%.  I have to believe that the ratings are for smooth asphalt use, with no bumps, bounces, potholes, or normal road conditions which make the effective loads considerably higher.

    The bottom line in my opinion, is that the tire I will use from now on in every street application, is one that will serve without significant sidewall flexing that generates heat and cord damage which could lead to failure.  My Suburban got "Load Range E" Michelins.  Great improvement over the XLT (Extra Load Light Truck) tires which were on it when I bought it.  I only replaced them (with the same thing!) at 60K miles because one got a nail in the sidewall, and a single new one would have had a significant difference in circumference.

    Big trailers use even "Load Range F" tires.

    If you want to avoid issues with your trailer tires, go with at least "D", or even "E" rated ones.  "C"?  Forget it!  I looked at a friend's brand new enclosed two-axle trailer.  The "Load Range C" tires total rated capacity only exceeded the GVWR of the trailer itself by 1000 pounds.  One big "whoop" rise and drop on a highway will effectively go WAY beyond that.  The correct tire is one which can handle dynamic loading, not just static loading.

    toy4speed
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    20 Apr 2014 01:41 PM
    Thanks guys. Good discussion. I tend to agree that there are no "great" trailer tires. I definitely will stay with load range E tires for the dual axle enclosed trailer. Apparently all trailer tires made in China, or as I discovered even Maxxis is made in Thailand. Such a discision. Yes, will replace every 3-4 years, keep out of sun in storage, run at 80 psi. Still, shopping is frustrating.
    F125AXer
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    Posts:253


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    17 Dec 2014 09:56 PM
    Annndddd...

    My employer has me looking for tires to put on the car hauler trailer I tow for work.

    Any further suggestions/experience on recent purchases?

    Minimum load range "D" which would match the Goodyears on it now, with an option for "E" tires.

    ST 225/75R15
     

    47CP
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    18 Dec 2014 10:49 AM
    Alan,

    We use 225-75-15 on the SPS Store trailer. We have used both the (chinese) Goodyear D rated and the Maxxis E rated with equal success - neither has shown anything weird over the same amount of miles.

    I notice that Tire Rack has the Towmax tires in LRE. I have used these in the 13" sizes on my racecar trailer and they seem OK as well.

    Acknowledging the above conversations - I agree that all trailer tires suck and that when I say "OK" it is relative to other brands, not other real tires.

    DaveW
    General Default
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    18 Dec 2014 12:20 PM
    I will toss out a tire that many do not talk about. The Kumho 857 Trailer Tire. D-rated. When I was looking I looked at some specs also and noticed that the Kumho had a higher speed rating than most trailer tires. The Kumho is rated up to 99 mph. Seem like most trailer tires are only speed rated to 65 mph. Just about everyone exceeds that at some point.

    About the tire.
    [url]http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires...;/url]

    Load range and speed specs
    http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiret...18165817:s

    TeamRX8 said he did not have good luck with the tires but I have not had problems on a two axle open trailer.

    I think it is the twisting and sideways sliding of the trailer in parking and turning that damages the tires. Some might handle that better than others.
    47CP
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    18 Dec 2014 12:41 PM
    14 inch only on the Kuhmo
    F125AXer
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    18 Dec 2014 05:51 PM
    Posted By 47CP on 18 Dec 2014 12:41 PM
    14 inch only on the Kuhmo

    Yep, that is what I see also.

     

    Based on the good service I have experienced with the Goodyears, it looks like that is the tire which will be put back on.  I'll be looking closely at the date codes before they are mounted.

     

    These are for the open aluminum car hauler described earlier.  As of this time I have put 25K on the truck/trailer setup since February.  Being DOT compliant, a single day tow can only run into the low 600 + miles range.  But the trailer is used very often.  Not towing tomorrow, yet I put on over 1300 miles this week, without leaving Michigan.

     

    The truck has big bi-lens mirrors, and I am very careful to not curb or rub the trailer tires on obstacles.  But I agree that for many applications, the twisting in tight turns can be very destructive.

     

    Thanks Dave, and "GenD"  


    loudes13
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    23 Dec 2014 03:50 PM
    I'm still hoping for a better 15" option. Any LT tires in 15". Seems like most start with 16". I want a set before spring.
    47CP
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    23 Dec 2014 04:51 PM
    I think you can hope in one hand and poop in the other on that...

    The closest thing is a 235-75-15 XLoad, which still doesn't have the capacity of even a 205 trailer tire with LR C. And won't fit under most trailer fenders.

    My new (to me) enclosed trailer is only 24' long, but the previous owner got 3 axles, which is kind of nice as it can use the 205 tires and they are lightly loaded.

    DaveW
    F125AXer
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    23 Dec 2014 10:23 PM
    The LT (Light Truck) tire is not a good option for a trailer, IMO.

    Much better: http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires...&tab=Sizes

    Load Range D trailer tire.

    Then there is: http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires...&tab=Sizes

    Load Range E trailer tire!

    They also have LR D's in 205 and 225 sizes. Worth checking out...

    Alan
    loudes13
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    28 Dec 2014 12:27 PM
    What's the speed rating of the Power King E's?

    My car is only 800lbs, but I exceed 68mph on every tow.
    47CP
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    28 Dec 2014 08:53 PM
    The car weight is somewhat irrelevant - what does the trailer weigh overall?

    I don't think the Power King have any speed rating, just like the other trailer tire.

    DaveW
    TeamRX8
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    03 Feb 2015 11:50 PM

    Posted By General Default on 18 Dec 2014 12:20 PM
    I will toss out a tire that many do not talk about. The Kumho 857 Trailer Tire. D-rated.



    yeah ... as you noted I talked about it rather negatively:

    http://www.sccaforums.com/forums/aft/432035

    I finally got fed up replacing them and fenders a combined pair at a time and just tossed them all, no problem before or after so who knows.

    just the same, DO NOT RECOMMEND!!!
    autocrossaddict
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    04 Feb 2015 10:12 AM
    Along this topic. If I want to upgrade to a 15x6 - 225/15 Load D setup can I do one axle at a time, or just suck it up and convert the entire rig?
    Ryno
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    04 Feb 2015 10:23 AM
    Coming from someone that has had close to 2 dozen blowouts in the last 7-8 years on 3 different trailers I'd buy the best tire you can.
    After having 2 blowouts on our way to Crows Landing last year I replaced all the tires that were only 3-4 years old with the Goodyear G114's.
    Mine are 17.5" with a Load range H. I found many different brands that had the same weight rating the only difference was these were speed rated up to 75 MPH as opposed to 65 in any other brand I could find. I only have about 4-5,000 miles on them since putting them on but so far so good.

    I do have to say every blowout I have had was when exceeding 65 MPH so I think the speed rating is very important.
    F125AXer
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    04 Feb 2015 05:48 PM
    Wow. The G114 is a semi-trailer tire.
    That is a lot of blowouts. A lot. How many axles does your trailer have? 3? The real problem with those trailers is the tearing of tire cords under the lateral loads imposed during tight radius turns. The front tires in particular are subjected to dragging sideways across the pavement during parking lot style maneuvers. If you only have two axles, you might want to start by investing in a standard infrared temperature gauge, and quicky give each tire a check on the sidewalls and at the center of the tread each time you stop. That way you can see if they are heating up during highway driving. To me that means an axle misalignment, or uneven loading. If they run cool on the highway, then the problem is stemming from something happening during low speed/tight turns to damage the carcass. If the blowouts are consistently on the right side, then you could be picking up damaging debris on the outside of the edge stripe.
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