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Last Post 18 Aug 2010 06:50 AM by  Joe_914
Trailer tires Please school me
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Joe_914
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19 Jul 2010 06:23 AM

    24 ft pace enclosed trailer. it has 205/75-15 load range C (radial) trailer tires on it. build dates are in 05 so they are a bit old. Blew out two of them since Blytheville NT. Getting pretty old changing tires out on the road side.

    Is there a better option like 225 series load range D tire in radial or bias ply.

    We seem to haul a pretty good load in the trailer. 2 heavy shifter karts a Miata monster ice chest tires tools etc.

    PCalhoun
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    19 Jul 2010 07:43 AM

    Check to make sure you do not have the trailer overloaded and/or tires under-inflated. From the tire size you reference it sounds as if your 24' trailer has 3500# axles, which in my opinion are light for a full-size 24' auto hauler.

    Yes, you can go up a load rating on the tire without issue and you do want a 'ST' rated tire specifically for trailers., Stick to a radial and your choices are limited: Good Year Marathon is my preference if for no other reason that you can find dealers everywhere if you ever have a warranty issue. Maxxis also makes a decent trailer tire. Kenda, Carlisle, & Duro are also out there in the marketplace. Almost all will be coming out of China, though GY was going to bring production back to the USA before the economy tanked.

    Good Year Marathons are available from Tire Rack at very competitive prices. And don't forget to pack your wheel bearings since you'll have everything off.

    tholt29
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    19 Jul 2010 07:57 AM

    I'm a fan of the Maxxis tires. The people I have known that have run Goodyears on their enclosed trailers (me included) tend to get about 3 to 4 years before they begin to fail. The Maxxis that came on my Pace lasted 5 before they started blowing out. They are harder to find than the goodyears, but my local Discount Tire was able to get them within a couple of days.

    The bottom line is trailer tires tend to have a limited lifespan that is significantly less than the treadlife. Once you have a blowout for no apparant reason, and the tires are 3 plus years old you should probably go ahead and replace them all or at least be sure to have 2 good spares at all times. Chances are you you will have to replace them all within the next 12 months.

    Tom

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    19 Jul 2010 08:19 AM
    tholt29 wrote:

    I'm a fan of the Maxxis tires. The people I have known that have run Goodyears on their enclosed trailers (me included) tend to get about 3 to 4 years before they begin to fail. The Maxxis that came on my Pace lasted 5 before they started blowing out. They are harder to find than the goodyears, but my local Discount Tire was able to get them within a couple of days.

    The bottom line is trailer tires tend to have a limited lifespan that is significantly less than the treadlife. Once you have a blowout for no apparant reason, and the tires are 3 plus years old you should probably go ahead and replace them all or at least be sure to have 2 good spares at all times. Chances are you you will have to replace them all within the next 12 months.

    Tom

    Ditto what everyone else said. We get 2 seasons out of ours, but they probably get more miles than a lot of trailers. Once one goes, the others are not far behind. I was trying to save money last year when we had a blowout on the way to Blytheville for a divisional and only replaced the one. Sure enough, we had more blowouts throughout the season, one tearing up the side of the trailer and one on the way to the runoffs that almost wrecked the whole rig. I replaced all the tires and we carry a mounted spare and a loose one. Some Wal-marts carry the 225 Load Range D tires, but many do not.

    With my adventures last year, I ended up with 2 Maxxis and 2 goodyear, we will see if the Maxxis last longer. I have heard other people having the same experience as Tom with them.

    HTH,

    DaveW

    Joe_914
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    19 Jul 2010 08:21 AM

    Well that eases my mind a bit. Considering these are 5 + years old two have been replaced (time has expired on them) and I guess that leaves only 2 more to replace.

    2 spares might be a great idea towing to Lincoln.

    atcovan
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    19 Jul 2010 09:30 AM
    I'd definitely upgrade to a larger tire. 205's are really too small for a car alone, so a trailer with a car inside plus all your gear is way too much for them. Also, fill them to the max pressure while cold. I had a 20' enclosed with a lot of stuff and ran 80lbs cold in my Marathon 225's and never had them over heating.
    Impala SS AutoXer
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    20 Jul 2010 07:03 PM

    Couple of notes, from having an 18' open trailer that has a pair of 3500lb axles (and I'm pretty close to that on each axle when I throw my 96 Impala SS on the trailer instead of the ST 89 Civic) and 14" wheels (205/75R14) :

    1. On the GoodYear Marathons, be sure you get the "Made in the USA" ones. The "Made in China" ones are junk and prone to early blowouts. Ask me how I know [;)]

    2. IF it'll fit your trailer brakes, I've been impressed with the 14" sized Kumho Radial 857 Trailer tire (available thru TireRack). Namely, it has a higher load rating than anything else I've found in a 14" trailer tire...2094lbs per tire for the 195R14 and 2271 lbs per tire for the 205R14. This is a Load Range D tire, not C like most tires in those sizes.

    TeamRX8
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    20 Jul 2010 10:51 PM

    I purchased the Kumho 857 Radial tires from Tirerack for my trailer several months ago. I had three full seasons of heavy towing mileage on some no-name cheapo tires that came with the trailer. Never had one fail or leak, they were getting low on tread depth so I swapped them all out.

    The Kumho 857 are the higher ply Class D, but they are also 80 series aspect ratio in the 205R14 size, not 75 series. If you have the fender clearance for approx. a 1/2" radius increase over the 75 series tires this will serve you better on a trailer tire than going to a 225 width. My car + trailer + misc gear only weighs maybe 4500# total with dual axles so easily over conservative given their load rating.

    Matt93SE
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    22 Jul 2010 12:15 PM

    I'll throw another Ditto in there.

    I took my 24' pace out the other day and drove it across Houston- about 80 miles round trip. had a blowout about 15 miles from home. (make sure you keep a lugwrench and a ramp or a jack in the trailer so you don't have to call your wife and beg for her to drop what she's doing and come save your stupid butt!)

    Anyway, I blew that one. okay. toss on the spare and head home. called up the local NTB and ordered another Marathon. didn't think to ask about load ratings. I got a C when I went to pick it up. doh. stuff on the trailer are D. oh well. it'll work as a spare if I gotta.

    3 days later I loaded my car up and headed to college station- 120 miles each way. less than 10 miles from home I blew another tire. good thing I got the spare and I remembered my lugwrench!

    10 miles later- in downtown Houston traffic at 4pm on a Friday no less- I blew another tire! Since I had no additional spare, I pulled off at the next exit in houston and pulled the blown tire off. Creeped at 25mph to the nearest Discount tire and bought a full set of E load tires. the only thing they had available were Carlisle in 225/75/15 (or 70, I forget now)..

    3hrs later I was back on the road with new rubber all the way around. In the last month, I've bought 2 sets of race tires for my car, tires for the wife's Honda, trailer tires, and truck tires. dang.

    Joe_914
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    23 Jul 2010 09:33 AM

    Yea them tire manufactures sure do like us racer folks.

    Same scenario, it all starts with one tire giving up and then it spreads like wild fire to every rubber tired thing in the driveway.

    So help me if I get a flat on my lawn mower I am just going inside and drink beer till the pain stops.

    t walgamuth
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    24 Jul 2010 01:21 PM
    I don't like the marathons. I blew one on my travel trailer that was only 3 or 4 years old and had lots of tread and no cracking. I replaced all four with a tire my local tire company recommended....might be maxxis or carlisle both sound familiar.
    atcovan
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    24 Jul 2010 05:31 PM
    t walgamuth wrote:
    I don't like the marathons. I blew one on my travel trailer that was only 3 or 4 years old and had lots of tread and no cracking. I replaced all four with a tire my local tire company recommended....might be maxxis or carlisle both sound familiar.
    You might have hit a nail and lost air. That would cause it to overheat and blow. Were your Marathons USA or Chinese? What size? If you have 205's, make the move up to 225's. It's the best insurance. 4 years is kinda stretching it, as tires deteriorate over time and exposure to the sun, not miles.
    Phillip S. Osborne
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    27 Jul 2010 11:14 AM
    Trailers stored inside are not as suceptable to dry rot, and will generally last longer. I just purchased a new Featherlite 17.5' deck, with 205 75 15 tires and 3500lb axles. Tires are HI RUN....anyone ever heard of those?
    tholt29
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    27 Jul 2010 11:48 AM

    I have never had a set of trailer tires dry rot before failure. I think the biggest contributor to their relatively short life is just the brutal side loads thay have to endure when turning. If you have ever looked at the inside tires when you go around a tight turn, you will see one pulled hard inboard and one pushed hard outboard. That has to contribute to the typical tread separation failure that seems to be the norm when they do let go.

    Tom

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    27 Jul 2010 11:54 AM
    tholt29 wrote:

    I have never had a set of trailer tires dry rot before failure. I think the biggest contributor to their relatively short life is just the brutal side loads thay have to endure when turning. If you have ever looked at the inside tires when you go around a tight turn, you will see one pulled hard inboard and one pushed hard outboard. That has to contribute to the typical tread separation failure that seems to be the norm when they do let go.

    Tom

    Heck, it is rare that I have seen them fail with any visible tread wear, much less dry rot. :) We do 10k miles per year (at least) and they get replaced every 3rd season.

    I agree about the side loads and also wonder if increased wear is also becuase of the heavy weight compared to total load capacity. An enclosed trailer with 205-15's has 7k of tire capacity, trailer probably weighs 3k, most cars another 3k, then you add tools, etc. Even if not overloaded, you likely run at 80-95% capacity when loaded. COmpare that to the total load capacity of the tires on your car/truck and how much of that you use.

    DaveW

    Dick Rasmussen
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    27 Jul 2010 05:53 PM

    I have a single axle open trailer which weighs about 2500 lbs fully loaded with race car, extra wheels/tires, and stuff in storage boxes.

    I had a US made GY load range C trailer tire rated for about as much load as the whole loaded trailer weighs BLOW in the sun at home as the spare! The tire had been used for several years before becoming the spare but was almost full tread. it did not have a tire cover on it. I had a Michelin load range E tire which had been somewhat overloaded (somewhat lower than needed pressure) early in its life on my camper van blow in the sun at home mounted as a spare at the time. It had been covered as a spare. Fortunately neither did any damage to the vehicles or people. Both made BIG bangs (I was home at the time). Apparently tires don't like setting around in the weather for extended time periods.Tire pressures would not have been higher than normal ratings, even in the sun. Obviously both had internal damage (including possible tread separation aggravated by belt rust or carcass rot) which allowed the blowouts.

    Dick

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    gpny
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    02 Aug 2010 11:07 AM

    The enclosed trailer I have (1997 Haulmark) came with 2007 Good Year WorkHorse 7.00 x 15lt Tires - Load Range D - Made in Peru

    I've never had issues with them, but I haven't found much information about them anywhere. anyone here know about them?

    PCalhoun
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    04 Aug 2010 05:23 PM
    gpny wrote:

    The enclosed trailer I have (1997 Haulmark) came with 2007 Good Year WorkHorse 7.00 x 15lt Tires - Load Range D - Made in Peru

    I've never had issues with them, but I haven't found much information about them anywhere. anyone here know about them?

    That is an LT truck tire. Trailer tires are typically rated ST and in the Good Year line-up named Marathons. They were made in the USA, moved to China, and now are suppossedly coming back to the USA, but there is a boatload of unused inventory sitting around I would suspect due to the downturn in the trailer and RV industry the past three years.

    fyrballmt
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    04 Aug 2010 07:43 PM
    Just some info. RVer's hate trailer tires and most have started useing a load range E LT tire. At least in the 16 inch size. They are useing the LT 235/85-16. Not sure if the same can be said about the 15inch sizes. I am useing LT235/75-15's on my open trailer because that is what the guys that do many miles of towing a year recomended. ST is a dirty word to most RVer's.
    mwood
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    04 Aug 2010 07:53 PM

    I believe (for some reason) that the idea of "tire bruising" leads to a lot of our problems...how many times have you had a blow out AND total tread separation? I know I've had at least one...[;)]

    A "STONE BRUISE," according to a tire expert, is the term used to describe an injury to a tire caused by striking some object with sufficient force to cause the tire fabric to be broken. The break may be in only one ply or it may be in all of them, but in any case it is always the inside ply that breaks first

    Anyhow, we have Maxxis on the "back up" trailer and a set of U.S. made Marathons on the primary and both have been fine, fwiw.

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